ggFTW

MMORPG Gamer Community


Go Back   ggFTW Forum > Off Topic > General Discussion

Eudemons Online
Looking for a new MMO?

Try 

Eudemons Online

Rating:  

7.0

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
07-13-2008   #1 (permalink)
why so serious?
Special
BatgirlZKE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Gotham City
Posts: 531
Blog Entries: 1
iTrader: (3)
BatgirlZKE is on a distinguished road
Send a message via AIM to BatgirlZKE Send a message via MSN to BatgirlZKE Send a message via Yahoo to BatgirlZKE
IGN: SelenaKyle
Class: Cat (Charm) to_entertainer
Level: 123
Guild: Pantsu
Default Don't leave your pets in the car in the summer!

(from HSUS)

The Dog Days of Summer

Common sense tells most people that leaving their pet inside a parked vehicle on a hot, summer day could be dangerous after an extended period of time. But most people don't realize that the temperature can skyrocket after just a few minutes. Parking in the shade or leaving the windows cracked does little to alleviate this pressure cooker.

On a warm, sunny day windows collect light, trapping heat inside the vehicle, and pushing the temperature inside to dangerous levels. On an 85-degree Fahrenheit day, for example, the temperature inside a car with the windows opened slightly can reach 102 degrees within ten minutes. After 30 minutes, the temperature will reach 120 degrees. At 110 degrees, pets are in danger of heatstroke. On hot and humid days, the temperature in a car parked in direct sunlight can rise more than 30 degrees per minute, and quickly become lethal.

A recent study by the Stanford University School of Medicine showed that temperatures inside cars can rise dramatically even on mild days. With outside temperatures as low as 72 degrees, researchers found that a car's interior temperature can heat up by an average of 40 degrees within an hour, with 80% of that increase in the first 30 minutes. A cracked window provides little relief from this oven effect. The Stanford researchers found that a cracked window had an insignificant effect on both the rate of heating and the final temperature after an hour.

Pets, more so than humans, are susceptible to overheating. While people can roll down windows, turn on the air conditioner or exit the vehicle when they become too hot, pets cannot. And pets are much less efficient at cooling themselves than people are.

Dogs, for example, are designed to conserve heat. Their sweat glands, which exist on their nose and the pads of their feet, are inadequate for cooling during hot days. Panting and drinking water helps cool them, but if they only have overheated air to breathe, dogs can suffer brain and organ damage after just 15 minutes. Short-nosed breeds, like pugs and bulldogs, young pets, seniors or pets with weight, respiratory, cardiovascular or other health problems are especially susceptible to heat-related stress.

Pets on the Move

While it used to be that our animals stayed home to guard the couch, increasingly dogs, cats and other pets are going along for the ride, whether tagging along during errands or putting in major mileage during the family vacation. The high number of animals on the road means that awareness and vigilance are essential for protecting pets from parking-lot peril. Help spread the word by following these tips:

* Remind friends to keep their pets at home during the summer months if they'll be going anywhere pets are not allowed.
* Educate others by distributing posters or by leaving brochures on windshields. The HSUS has posters, available for a nominal fee ($3 for 10/ $5 for 25), that store managers can post inside their windows to remind shoppers that "Leaving Your Pet in a Parked Car Can Be a Deadly Mistake." Similar, 4" x 9" hot car flyers are also available (50 for $3) at the address below. For a sample brochure, send a SASE to HSUS/Hot Cars, 2100 L St., NW, Washington, D.C. 20037.
* Get involved. If you see a pet in a parked car during a summer day, go to the nearest store and have the owner paged. Enlist the help of a local police officer or security guard or call the local police department and animal control office.

Deb Antoniades, of Monroe County, New York is an animal lover who not only keeps her own pets at home when the temperatures rise, but who is vigilant about keeping other animals safe as well. "I keep a stack of photocopies in my glove compartment of an article about the dangers of leaving a dog in your car in the summer—even with the windows open. I leave [the articles] under the windshield wiper of any car I notice with a dog left inside. I've called 911 a couple of times as well."

Taking Action

In case of an emergency, it's important to be able to identify the symptoms of heat stress caused by exposure to extreme temperatures. Check the animal for signs of heavy panting, glazed eyes, a rapid heartbeat, restlessness, excessive thirst, lethargy, fever, dizziness, lack of coordination, profuse salivation, vomiting, a deep red or purple tongue, and unconsciousness.

If the animal shows symptoms of heatstroke, take steps to gradually lower her body temperature immediately. Follow these tips, and it could save her life:

* Move the animal into the shade or an air-conditioned area.
* Apply ice packs or cold towels to her head, neck, and chest or immerse her in cool (not cold) water.
* Let her drink small amounts of cool water or lick ice cubes.
* Take her directly to a veterinarian.

In many states, it's against the law to leave a pet unattended in a parked vehicle in a manner than endangers the health or safety of the animal. Despite these laws, not to mention a basic common sense that should guide most pet owners during the summer, companion animals die every year from heatstroke. The worst part is knowing that each death was preventable. That's why sharing this information is so important. Summers, after all, are truly supposed to be carefree.

*I've seen this firsthand and it is horrible. Someone left their dog in the car, without cracking the windows. We couldn't save her. It was a shame*
__________________

***Visit G0tham City!*Population*Industry*Transportation***
 
Get rid of this ad by registering for our community.
07-14-2008   #2 (permalink)
twerk
Special
ggFTW Pro
Games
Trickster OnlineLeague of LegendsMapleStoryWonderKing Online
Awards Retired Forum ModeratorWandering EyeFacebook FanPervert Award
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Alexandria
Posts: 7,513
Blog Entries: 54
iTrader: (2)
james has a reputation beyond reputejames has a reputation beyond reputejames has a reputation beyond reputejames has a reputation beyond reputejames has a reputation beyond reputejames has a reputation beyond reputejames has a reputation beyond reputejames has a reputation beyond reputejames has a reputation beyond reputejames has a reputation beyond reputejames has a reputation beyond repute
Default

Thank yous Batgirl! So informative~
Though that was a bummer that you couldn't save the dog. Call 911 and have the Police/Firefighters use the Jaws of Life to /kill car? Happy dogee! 8D
__________________
smorgasboreds
 
07-14-2008   #3 (permalink)
why so serious?
Special
BatgirlZKE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Gotham City
Posts: 531
Blog Entries: 1
iTrader: (3)
BatgirlZKE is on a distinguished road
Send a message via AIM to BatgirlZKE Send a message via MSN to BatgirlZKE Send a message via Yahoo to BatgirlZKE
IGN: SelenaKyle
Class: Cat (Charm) to_entertainer
Level: 123
Guild: Pantsu
Default

Oh I was working at the Humane Society at the time. They brought the dog to us.

If I ever saw a dog/cat/etc in a car suffering of heatstroke, I'd break the damn window myself...then call the cops
__________________

***Visit G0tham City!*Population*Industry*Transportation***
 

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Tribal Wars
Need a new browser game?

Try 

Tribal Wars

Rating:  

6.5
Hide this banner by registering for our community.