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06-27-2010   #1 (permalink)
Griever
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IGN: Werewolf
Class: Healer to_buffalo
Level: 20
Guild: RustyHearts
Default Making Lunia run faster.

Disclaimer: YOU ARE MESSING AROUND WITH POTENTIALLY DESTRUCTIVE COMPUTER SETTINGS. ANY INFORMATION INCLUDED IN OR AVAILABLE THROUGH THIS TOPIC, OR WEBSITE MAY INCLUDE INACCURACIES OR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. NEITHER I, NOR THE WEBSITE AND PARTIES WITHIN ARE RESPONSIBLE OR LIABLE FOR ANY DAMAGES THAT INCUR FROM THIS GUIDE. BY PROCEEDING, YOU ALONE ARE HELD RESPONSIBLE AND LIABLE FOR ANY DAMAGES OR INCONVENIENCES INCURRED THEREIN AND THROUGHOUT.

Now that we have that out of the way. This mini-guide will show you a few ways in which you can slightly (or significantly) reduce lag or framerate issues without sacrificing too much quality. Some of these you may already know, and others are a bit more crafty.

NOTE: If you receive lag due to your location in respect to the servers (Irvine, California, USA.) there's nothing that can really help you besides getting a better internet connection or moving closer to Irvine (which I wouldn't recommend.) <_<

Terminology

Here are some terms you may encounter while screwing with your Lunia settings. It's important to know what exactly you're editing to get the best possible outcome for your computer specs. Note: these are just simple explanations of what certain things are. I'm not going to go into any substantial breadth.

Shadows: Yes, shadows. Turn them off. They're not necessary and they actually (surprisingly) are huge performance-leeches. I don't think anyone even notices shadows unless you're really anal about visual quality.

Double Buffering/Triple Buffering: Dealing with "chunks" of data as opposed to "streams" of data (audio.) Wikipedia gives a very simple analogy of how computers use Bibuffering and Tribuffering.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
It is a nice sunny day and you have decided to fill the pool up, only you can not find your garden hose. You'll have to fill the pool with buckets. So you fill one bucket (or buffer) from the tap, turn the tap off, walk over to the pool, pour the water in, walk back to the tap to repeat the exercise. This is analogous to single buffering. The tap has to be turned off while you "process" the bucket of water.

Now consider how you would do it if you had two buckets. You would fill the first bucket and then swap the second in under the running tap. You then have the length of time it takes for the second bucket to fill in order to empty the first into the paddling pool. When you return you can simply swap the buckets so that the first is now filling again, during which time you can empty the second into the pool. It is clear to see that this technique will fill the pool far faster as there is much less time spent waiting, doing nothing, while buckets fill. This is analogous to double buffering. The tap can be on all the time and does not have to wait while the processing is done.
VSYNC (Vertical Sync): Basically makes the frame rate the same as your Monitor Refresh Rate (Desktop>Properties/Personalize[for Vista users]>Advanced Settings>Monitor>Screen Refresh Rate) to ensure crap doesn't exceed what your monitor can handle. The default is usually 60 Hertz.

Anisotropic Filtering: Enhances texture quality for images that are viewed at odd angles (with the addition of 3D to Lunia in the most recent KTest patch, this will actually become more important.) It's more or less anti-aliasing for images viewed from a bird's eye view (overhead) or a worm's eye view (underhead.) Anisotropic filtering is another hit for performance. Turn it off completely or leave it at 2x.

Anti-aliasing: Have you ever played an old game and seen those jagged edges that look like stairs which indicates poor image quality? Anti-aliasing smooths those edges out. Like shadows, Antialiasing is yet another performance leech. I wouldn't recommend turning it off completely, because it will make certain images look ghastly and like it was made for the Nintendo 64, but having a high value isn't recommended either. 2x Antialiasing is just fine. 4x if you have a newer PC (last 3 years or so.) Going above 4x isn't really recommended for anyone simply because after that, it really doesn't do all that much.



Texture Filtering: This runs the gamut sharpening stationary images (i.e. a non-moving background such as a wall or building in the square) to introducing antialiasing for non-stationary images (the water in the square or Practice Field.) It's surprisingly not as performance-straining as you might think. I would recommend having it in Medium or High Quality.

Particle Rate/Particle Limit: This one is a bit strange. These 2 options affect the amount and detail of "particles" you see on screen (explosions, sparkles, skill animations, etc.) This is a big cause of framerate drops, especially for lower-end computers or outdated graphics cards. If you graphics card can't render these particles fast enough, it'll cause a drop in framerate.
Warning: If you set it too low you can actually turn some attacks invisible (Foriel's "wave" attack comes to mind. I learned that the hard way.)

Lowest you can set these to is 0 and Highest is 100.
I would recommend leaving both at 10 or 50. Setting them to 0 will cause it so that you can't see some attacks, which isn't a good thing. Leaving them at 10 will ensure you can still see the attack, it just won't be in much detail.

Those are all the major ones. There's a bunch of other things such as Max Pre-Rendered Frame Limits and stuff, but I'm lazy so I don't feel like writing more.

Speed "Fixes"

0.) Resolution

Before anything, I highly recommend setting your Lunia Resolution (can be checked in the Options tab of Lunia during gameplay or, I believe, in the Ijji Reactor) to the SAME as your Monitor resolution setting. The less frames and pixels your monitor has to "build" the faster your graphics card can render pixels.

1.) Editing Lunia settings

The most obvious. Using the information above, you can accommodate your Lunia settings to the individual specs of your computer.

Here's some basic settings that will help Lunia run smoothly, but still be aesthetically pleasing.
Texture Sharpness: 100
Particle Rate/Limit: 10
Antialiasing: 4x
Buffering: Double
Glow Effect: Off
Shadows: Off
Character Outline: On
VSYNC: On

1.5.) The Obvious

Process Editing:
While running Lunia, open the Task Manager and find LuniaClient.exe. Right Click LuniaClient.exe, select "Set Priority" and choose "High" or "Above Normal."

Compatibility Settings: (Usually for Vista users)
Go to your Lunia folder and find LuniaClient.exe. Right Click>Compatibility>
Tick:
-Disable visual themes
-Disable desktop composition

2.) Editing your Graphics Card

I only tried this with NVIDIA, but I'm relatively sure it would work the same with any other graphics card.
THE FOLLOWING WAS DONE ON A COMPUTER (WinXP). I'm not sure it will work on a laptop. THIS HAS POTENTIAL TO SCREW UP YOUR COMPUTER.

-Do a system restore just in case something goes wrong. You will be dealing with the Registry in this section.
-Start>Run>'regedit'
-The Registry should now be opened.
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE
+SOFTWARE
+NVIDIA Corporation
+Global
+NVTweak


-Edit>New>DWORD Value
-When editing DWORD Value, Vista users may have the choice of creating a 32 or 64 Bit file. Whatever the Bit value is in your Monitor Settings, choose that one.
-Name the file whatever you want.
-Right Click the DWORD Value file and click Modify.
-Value Data: 3
-Click OK
-Exit out of the Registry.
***-Right Click on the Desktop and go to Properties/Personalize. In the monitor Settings choose Advanced or Advanced Settings.
-Go to the tab that has the name of your graphics card.
-Clock Frequency Settings button
-Manual Overclocking (If you get a license agreement thing, it basically says what the disclaimer in this topic says. You void your warranty, they aren't responsible for damage done to your computer, yada yada, etc. etc. and the world keeps on rotating.)
-Increase the Core Clock Frequency first by 10-20 MHz intervals. Then click Test Changes.
-If everything is fine, increase Memory Clock Frequency by 20 MHz intervals. Click Test Changes.
-Tick "Apply at Startup"
-Click Apply, then OK.

3.) Editing your Graphics Card further

In the same section as allocated by the *** in the previous part, you can further edit your graphics card. Open the NVIDIA Control Panel and get to this screen:



Find Lunia and you can now edit your specific graphics card settings when you open Lunia.
If there's an option for something to be "Application-Controlled," choose that. Otherwise you can play around with everything here and tweak the various settings to your liking.

Last edited by Griever; 06-27-2010 at 01:59 AM.